A Luciferian Perspective on Ezekiel 28:12-19

 

Son of man, take up a lamentation upon the king of Tyrus, and say unto him, Thus saith the Lord God;

So as a preface, we must consider that while this passage has been attributed to Lucifer in an allusive fashion, it was meant to be addressed to the above mentioned king of Tyre. The parallels between the king of Tyre and Lucifer actually begin before verse 12, as verse 2 states “…thine heart is lifted up, and thou hast said, I am God, I sit in the seat of God, in the midst of the seas; yet thou art a man, and not God, though thou set thine heart as the heart of God”. Already we see the conflict of these two created beings seeking to become like God.

While generally people assume this to mean that Lucifer sought to de-throne God and take his place, or become even greater than God, I find that the bold really resonates with my own beliefs and Sufi interpretation of Iblis as having wished to align himself with God’s own heart, of being led to seek divine unification through his devotion. The idea of becoming like God is then more of an aspiration of Lucifer’s to emulate the central focus of his being–that I may rest more fully in You, that my heart may resemble Your heart and my desires be mine own no longer, but Yours. It is not dissimilar to the idea of following in Christ’s footsteps and being ‘Christ-like’, or the often-quoted verse of John 3:30–“He must increase, but I must decrease”.

This is also the reason why St. Michael’s name and battle cry translate to the question of “Who is like God?”, in mockery of Lucifer’s aspirations.

Thou sealest up the sum, full of wisdom, and perfect in beauty.Thou hast been in Eden the garden of God; every precious stone was thy covering, the sardius, topaz, and the diamond, the beryl, the onyx, and the jasper, the sapphire, the emerald, and the carbuncle, and gold: the workmanship of thy tabrets and of thy pipes was prepared in thee in the day that thou wast created.

I actually spoke a bit about these verses in a previous post, so I’m just going to link you to my entry Songs of Praise

Thou art the anointed cherub that covereth; and I have set thee so: thou wast upon the holy mountain of God; thou hast walked up and down in the midst of the stones of fire.

Something that was brought to my attention rather recently by WhoreofAbbadon is the etymology of the term ‘messiah’. I was not aware of the fact that ‘messiah’ literally translates to ‘anointed one’, and while obviously not all those anointed in biblical scripture are meant to be holy messiahs (I’m not even touching upon the political and cultural aspects behind the term, as that is best left for another discussion altogether), it does pose the interesting idea that perhaps Lucifer as the Morningstar, Firstborn Sun, and Heavenly Prince had an even greater purpose set out by God before his fall. Or even that like the title of Mourningstar, he never ceased to be worthy of such a destiny–‘messiah’, after all, is generally accepted to mean Liberator, and within Luciferian mindsets Lucifer definitely fulfills this role. 

Thou wast perfect in thy ways from the day that thou wast created, till iniquity was found in thee.By the multitude of thy merchandise they have filled the midst of thee with violence, and thou hast sinned: therefore I will cast thee as profane out of the mountain of God: and I will destroy thee, O covering cherub, from the midst of the stones of fire.

This is largely self-explanatory, as a reference to Lucifer’s exile

 Thine heart was lifted up because of thy beauty, thou hast corrupted thy wisdom by reason of thy brightness: I will cast thee to the ground, I will lay thee before kings, that they may behold thee.

 I think this is the verse that ultimately fuels the accusations that Lucifer fell because of narcissism and pride. It also works the broader allusion back into the frame story through the declaration ‘I will lay thee before kings, that they may behold thee’. Lucifer’s fate is being recounted to the king of Tyre, who has fallen in much the same way and is now being shamed and chastened. The statement ‘I will cast thee to the ground’ also supports the idea that Lucifer was not cast to a physical realm of Hell, but rather to Earth.

Thou hast defiled thy sanctuaries by the multitude of thine iniquities, by the iniquity of thy traffick; therefore will I bring forth a fire from the midst of thee, it shall devour thee, and I will bring thee to ashes upon the earth in the sight of all them that behold thee.All they that know thee among the people shall be astonished at thee: thou shalt be a terror

Again I will mention Songs of Praise, through which Lucifer is likened to a heavenly High Priest in charge of leading worship and glorification. His lofty aspirations and methods of adoration, however sincere and profoundly heartfelt, have made the act of his service profane in the eyes of God. So begins the demonization of Lucifer, and the collapse of his reputation into ‘evil incarnate’. 

and never shalt thou be any more.

I’ve always taken this to mean, ‘and from this point forward, you will be nothing [to me]’, which is absolutely heartbreaking for me. Not only is Lucifer being told that he can be nothing of value without the grace of his God, but that his Father and beloved creator won’t even acknowledge his existence–that he is literally worthless in his eyes. 

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A Luciferian Perspective on Matthew 4:1-11

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Many a layperson and theologian have read this particular passage and seen Jesus’s temptation in the desert as an act of malice from the devil, as an attempt to misguide the Redeemer and thus destroy mankind’s chance at redemption.

I believe that it is just another example of Lucifer acting as Adversary and Accuser, of challenging Christ to prove his worth as his Father’s reflection on earth, of preparing him for the role he was meant to fulfill, and of testing his dedication to his cause. In challenging Christ in a similar fashion to how humanity is challenged, the devil’s temptations also strengthened the ties between Shepherd and flock (“For we do not have a high priest who is unable to empathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted in every way, just as we are—yet he did not sin” Hebrews 4:15).

Then was Jesus led up of the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil.

Already this first line suggests that Jesus willingly went to face the trials set by the Accuser and Adversary of man, to which not even the Son of God, equal parts divine and human, was exempt. And not merely that he went of his own free will, but that he was led there by the Holy Spirit of God himself, that his Father would want the Son he has sent to earth as his representative to face the challenges of the devil. 

And when he had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was afterward an hungred.

And when the tempter came to him, he said, If thou be the Son of God, command that these stones be made bread.

But he answered and said, It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God.

In my opinion, this goes beyond the ‘sees starving man in the desert, offers food’ concept popularized by the Good Guy Lucifer meme. It asks the question of: ‘Why should a divine entity, much less a son of the Most High God, hunger?’, or rather, ‘Why should he know and endure the pangs of hunger when a simple request could transform the smallest of stones into a feast?’ 

Nevermind the fact that Jesus was undertaking a religious fast, which is already an act that if broken would suggest that he held his physical desires in higher regard than his devotion to God, but this could also be taken as a trial to test the endurance, the willingness of Christ to suffer for both his God and for all mankind. For if he could not endure hunger, would he have the strength to endure the sacrifice that awaited him on Calvary?

Then the devil taketh him up into the holy city, and setteth him on a pinnacle of the temple,

And saith unto him, If thou be the Son of God, cast thyself down: for it is written, He shall give his angels charge concerning thee: and in their hands they shall bear thee up, lest at any time thou dash thy foot against a stone.

Jesus said unto him, It is written again, Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God.

Having successfully passed the first trial, Christ’s faith in his Father is thus challenged, as well as his resolve to bear the weight of the task set before him.

It could also be said that this particular trial is in foreshadow to Christ’s musings at Gethsemane, in which he presents the idea that he could easily pray to his Father to send twelve legions of angels to stop his arrest and spare him his agony on the cross. 

To fulfill the role of Morningstar/Mourningstar, humility in sorrow and suffering is crucial. If Lucifer himself would not plead for a reprieve from his own suffering, what value would Christ’s sacrifice have if he had given in to his fear and asked for an easier oblation to fulfill? 

 

Again, the devil taketh him up into an exceeding high mountain, and showeth him all the kingdoms of the world, and the glory of them;

And saith unto him, All these things will I give thee, if thou wilt fall down and worship me.

Then saith Jesus unto him, Get thee hence, Satan: for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve.

Then the devil leaveth him, and, behold, angels came and ministered unto him

 

 The last of the three trials is perhaps the most heavy-hitting. The final test to ascertain Christ’s worth could be seen as the very trial that Lucifer was cast down for.

When asked to prostrate himself and worship a created being, man, he refused. He rebelled against a lesser law so that a higher one would be upheld—‘Though shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve’. For this, he was deemed unworthy in the eyes of his creator.And yet, when the same temptation is brought before Christ in the desert, that same such refusal is praised and glorified.

This final temptation makes me wonder whose benefit these trials were for, however. Were they a method in which Lucifer could test the worthiness of he who claimed to be his Father’s beloved son? Or were they requested by God himself, to prepare his son for the greater trials ahead?

If the latter, well, then this final trial seems more like a slap in the face to Lucifer than anything else, a cruel humiliation meant to capitalize on his shame and ‘failure’.

If the former, then this third trial to me exemplifies Lucifer’s own strength of character, in that he would be willing to reopen past wounds and to bare his own weakness in the eyes of his God and the Morningstar whom he has chosen to replace him, all for the sake of trying to discern whether or not this Christ figure is worthy of being seen as his Father’s reflection and earthly representative, as his Father deserves nothing but the best.

In Nomine Patris et Filii

This Sunday I attended mass for the first time in nearly ten years. I guess I should consider myself lucky that I wasn’t struck down on the spot.

But in all seriousness, this was a huge breakthrough in my own faith. 

I thought it would be difficult to go back, but I fell back into the rhythm as though I had never stopped attending. Even though I had gone to Spanish-only services throughout my childhood, it wasn’t a big deal transitioning to English hymns and prayers.

I did have a brief internal struggle about whether or not to kneel and genuflect though, but I figured that this was my god’s Father’s house, the Father he still loves, and so I should show the proper respect and humility regardless of my personal feelings towards him.

I think it was rather ironic that the scripture and homily for that day concerned the incomprehensibility of God, as I had originally sought to better understand what Lucifer saw within his Father that prompted such love. I did not find the answer to my question, but instead I experienced a side of Lucifer that simultaneously broke my heart and set it aflame with love and compassion.

For all that I respect and admire my god because of his unwillingness to be held back, for his insatiable curiosity and desire for knowledge, for his willingness to sacrifice anything and everything for what he believed to be right, that same love and deep sorrow for him has grown tenfold out of this experience.

For that brief hour, I experienced him as he must have once been before his fall. As Helel, whose very name is the root of praise and adoration and joy, whose hymns of reverence and love no longer reach the ears of his Maker. As the Morningstar and Firstborn Sun, knowing nothing but the glory of his creator and wanting nothing but to sing his praises. He whose life was meant to be one unending stream of adulation, who is now forever severed from his purpose.

In that time and space, the echo of longing from my god was nearly suffocating, and yet it bolstered my own willingness to participate and approach the mass with an open heart, to be the voice that might offer up the songs that go unheard from he who is himself a living tribute to his God.

He who now serves in the only way he knows how, by creating brokenness in the hopes that we might rebuild and strengthen our faith, by testing humanity through trial by fire so that they may be worthy of his Father and the gifts he has bestowed upon us, by enduring the scorn and hatred of man as their adversary and bearing their enmity so that his Father might not face the falling away and subsequent loss of yet another child.

Some say that he envies humanity, because we have the ability to commune and receive the grace and mercy of God that is eternally withheld from him, and that this has grown into a dark hatred and resentment for us. But its hard to believe that when I’m surrounded by others who have come to glorify their God and can feel nothing but a deep sense of comfort and joy emanating from my own, humbled at the sight of so many fulfilling the role he no longer can. 

I was reminded of the familiar quote by Mark Twain that I’ve run across countless times,

But who prays for Satan? Who in eighteen centuries, has had the common humanity to pray for the one sinner that needed it most, our one fellow and brother who most needed a friend yet had not a single one, the one sinner among us all who had the highest and clearest right to every Christian’s daily and nightly prayers, for the plain and unassailable reason that his was the first and greatest need, he being among sinners the supremest?

I always thought that praying for my god was rather unnecessary, however beautiful the sentiment might be to pray on his behalf—to truly love thy ‘enemy’, to ask nothing for myself but rather that he may one day know his father’s mercy and love once more. But he has borne the burden of his transgression for countless years without once seeking forgiveness and redemption, why would I pray for something he himself has never asked for?

It has been speculated on this blog before, however, that perhaps he does not believe himself worthy of asking for such a mercy. For all his pride, such an act of humility begs the question of whether that pride is truly fixed upon himself as an independent being, or as an extension and reflection of the Most High God. Perhaps in withholding forgiveness from himself, he is once more acting as the Adversary and Accuser, this time holding himself to higher and higher standards because he holds that same light of God within him.

So while I may never fully comprehend the devotion Lucifer has to his God or the reasons behind it, I think I might just continue to attend mass on a regular basis if only on behalf of my god, and perhaps to light a candle or two in prayer for the devil.