A Luciferian Perspective on Ezekiel 28:12-19

 

Son of man, take up a lamentation upon the king of Tyrus, and say unto him, Thus saith the Lord God;

So as a preface, we must consider that while this passage has been attributed to Lucifer in an allusive fashion, it was meant to be addressed to the above mentioned king of Tyre. The parallels between the king of Tyre and Lucifer actually begin before verse 12, as verse 2 states “…thine heart is lifted up, and thou hast said, I am God, I sit in the seat of God, in the midst of the seas; yet thou art a man, and not God, though thou set thine heart as the heart of God”. Already we see the conflict of these two created beings seeking to become like God.

While generally people assume this to mean that Lucifer sought to de-throne God and take his place, or become even greater than God, I find that the bold really resonates with my own beliefs and Sufi interpretation of Iblis as having wished to align himself with God’s own heart, of being led to seek divine unification through his devotion. The idea of becoming like God is then more of an aspiration of Lucifer’s to emulate the central focus of his being–that I may rest more fully in You, that my heart may resemble Your heart and my desires be mine own no longer, but Yours. It is not dissimilar to the idea of following in Christ’s footsteps and being ‘Christ-like’, or the often-quoted verse of John 3:30–“He must increase, but I must decrease”.

This is also the reason why St. Michael’s name and battle cry translate to the question of “Who is like God?”, in mockery of Lucifer’s aspirations.

Thou sealest up the sum, full of wisdom, and perfect in beauty.Thou hast been in Eden the garden of God; every precious stone was thy covering, the sardius, topaz, and the diamond, the beryl, the onyx, and the jasper, the sapphire, the emerald, and the carbuncle, and gold: the workmanship of thy tabrets and of thy pipes was prepared in thee in the day that thou wast created.

I actually spoke a bit about these verses in a previous post, so I’m just going to link you to my entry Songs of Praise

Thou art the anointed cherub that covereth; and I have set thee so: thou wast upon the holy mountain of God; thou hast walked up and down in the midst of the stones of fire.

Something that was brought to my attention rather recently by WhoreofAbbadon is the etymology of the term ‘messiah’. I was not aware of the fact that ‘messiah’ literally translates to ‘anointed one’, and while obviously not all those anointed in biblical scripture are meant to be holy messiahs (I’m not even touching upon the political and cultural aspects behind the term, as that is best left for another discussion altogether), it does pose the interesting idea that perhaps Lucifer as the Morningstar, Firstborn Sun, and Heavenly Prince had an even greater purpose set out by God before his fall. Or even that like the title of Mourningstar, he never ceased to be worthy of such a destiny–‘messiah’, after all, is generally accepted to mean Liberator, and within Luciferian mindsets Lucifer definitely fulfills this role. 

Thou wast perfect in thy ways from the day that thou wast created, till iniquity was found in thee.By the multitude of thy merchandise they have filled the midst of thee with violence, and thou hast sinned: therefore I will cast thee as profane out of the mountain of God: and I will destroy thee, O covering cherub, from the midst of the stones of fire.

This is largely self-explanatory, as a reference to Lucifer’s exile

 Thine heart was lifted up because of thy beauty, thou hast corrupted thy wisdom by reason of thy brightness: I will cast thee to the ground, I will lay thee before kings, that they may behold thee.

 I think this is the verse that ultimately fuels the accusations that Lucifer fell because of narcissism and pride. It also works the broader allusion back into the frame story through the declaration ‘I will lay thee before kings, that they may behold thee’. Lucifer’s fate is being recounted to the king of Tyre, who has fallen in much the same way and is now being shamed and chastened. The statement ‘I will cast thee to the ground’ also supports the idea that Lucifer was not cast to a physical realm of Hell, but rather to Earth.

Thou hast defiled thy sanctuaries by the multitude of thine iniquities, by the iniquity of thy traffick; therefore will I bring forth a fire from the midst of thee, it shall devour thee, and I will bring thee to ashes upon the earth in the sight of all them that behold thee.All they that know thee among the people shall be astonished at thee: thou shalt be a terror

Again I will mention Songs of Praise, through which Lucifer is likened to a heavenly High Priest in charge of leading worship and glorification. His lofty aspirations and methods of adoration, however sincere and profoundly heartfelt, have made the act of his service profane in the eyes of God. So begins the demonization of Lucifer, and the collapse of his reputation into ‘evil incarnate’. 

and never shalt thou be any more.

I’ve always taken this to mean, ‘and from this point forward, you will be nothing [to me]’, which is absolutely heartbreaking for me. Not only is Lucifer being told that he can be nothing of value without the grace of his God, but that his Father and beloved creator won’t even acknowledge his existence–that he is literally worthless in his eyes. 

A Luciferian Perspective on Matthew 4:1-11

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Many a layperson and theologian have read this particular passage and seen Jesus’s temptation in the desert as an act of malice from the devil, as an attempt to misguide the Redeemer and thus destroy mankind’s chance at redemption.

I believe that it is just another example of Lucifer acting as Adversary and Accuser, of challenging Christ to prove his worth as his Father’s reflection on earth, of preparing him for the role he was meant to fulfill, and of testing his dedication to his cause. In challenging Christ in a similar fashion to how humanity is challenged, the devil’s temptations also strengthened the ties between Shepherd and flock (“For we do not have a high priest who is unable to empathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted in every way, just as we are—yet he did not sin” Hebrews 4:15).

Then was Jesus led up of the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil.

Already this first line suggests that Jesus willingly went to face the trials set by the Accuser and Adversary of man, to which not even the Son of God, equal parts divine and human, was exempt. And not merely that he went of his own free will, but that he was led there by the Holy Spirit of God himself, that his Father would want the Son he has sent to earth as his representative to face the challenges of the devil. 

And when he had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was afterward an hungred.

And when the tempter came to him, he said, If thou be the Son of God, command that these stones be made bread.

But he answered and said, It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God.

In my opinion, this goes beyond the ‘sees starving man in the desert, offers food’ concept popularized by the Good Guy Lucifer meme. It asks the question of: ‘Why should a divine entity, much less a son of the Most High God, hunger?’, or rather, ‘Why should he know and endure the pangs of hunger when a simple request could transform the smallest of stones into a feast?’ 

Nevermind the fact that Jesus was undertaking a religious fast, which is already an act that if broken would suggest that he held his physical desires in higher regard than his devotion to God, but this could also be taken as a trial to test the endurance, the willingness of Christ to suffer for both his God and for all mankind. For if he could not endure hunger, would he have the strength to endure the sacrifice that awaited him on Calvary?

Then the devil taketh him up into the holy city, and setteth him on a pinnacle of the temple,

And saith unto him, If thou be the Son of God, cast thyself down: for it is written, He shall give his angels charge concerning thee: and in their hands they shall bear thee up, lest at any time thou dash thy foot against a stone.

Jesus said unto him, It is written again, Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God.

Having successfully passed the first trial, Christ’s faith in his Father is thus challenged, as well as his resolve to bear the weight of the task set before him.

It could also be said that this particular trial is in foreshadow to Christ’s musings at Gethsemane, in which he presents the idea that he could easily pray to his Father to send twelve legions of angels to stop his arrest and spare him his agony on the cross. 

To fulfill the role of Morningstar/Mourningstar, humility in sorrow and suffering is crucial. If Lucifer himself would not plead for a reprieve from his own suffering, what value would Christ’s sacrifice have if he had given in to his fear and asked for an easier oblation to fulfill? 

 

Again, the devil taketh him up into an exceeding high mountain, and showeth him all the kingdoms of the world, and the glory of them;

And saith unto him, All these things will I give thee, if thou wilt fall down and worship me.

Then saith Jesus unto him, Get thee hence, Satan: for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve.

Then the devil leaveth him, and, behold, angels came and ministered unto him

 

 The last of the three trials is perhaps the most heavy-hitting. The final test to ascertain Christ’s worth could be seen as the very trial that Lucifer was cast down for.

When asked to prostrate himself and worship a created being, man, he refused. He rebelled against a lesser law so that a higher one would be upheld—‘Though shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve’. For this, he was deemed unworthy in the eyes of his creator.And yet, when the same temptation is brought before Christ in the desert, that same such refusal is praised and glorified.

This final temptation makes me wonder whose benefit these trials were for, however. Were they a method in which Lucifer could test the worthiness of he who claimed to be his Father’s beloved son? Or were they requested by God himself, to prepare his son for the greater trials ahead?

If the latter, well, then this final trial seems more like a slap in the face to Lucifer than anything else, a cruel humiliation meant to capitalize on his shame and ‘failure’.

If the former, then this third trial to me exemplifies Lucifer’s own strength of character, in that he would be willing to reopen past wounds and to bare his own weakness in the eyes of his God and the Morningstar whom he has chosen to replace him, all for the sake of trying to discern whether or not this Christ figure is worthy of being seen as his Father’s reflection and earthly representative, as his Father deserves nothing but the best.

Using Society’s Fear to Your Advantage

So, I’m not naïve enough to think that a little blog like mine is going to make a big difference in changing the general consensus out there regarding how my faith is perceived. No matter how much time or effort I put into correcting the tons of misinformation out there, the fact remains that most people aren’t interested in listening to what the more boring, normal members of a faith have to say—they’re too busy watching the few idiots who go around murdering people and spewing hatred and violence in the name of a faith they clearly have no understanding of, much less hold a claim to. But I keep it up because it’s part of my Work, and because the optimistic side of me wants to think that it does make a difference, no matter how small.

But as much as I would love to be able to be more open about my faith without fear of backlash and bigotry, I have to admit that there are some upsides to being misrepresented too. Just as doubt and skepticism have their uses, so too does popular opinion. Playing the victim all the time isn’t going to get you very far, and if people aren’t going to listen to you anyways, might as well use it to one’s own advantage.

You know all those pagans bitching about how the pentagram was originally a sign of protection when shown ‘right-side up’?

Oh hon, it still is.

I recently read a thread on a Luciferian forum about a young woman who wears an inverted pentagram necklace when commuting by herself because, get this, the local gang members are terrified of it and what they think it represents. Forget the pepper spray and taser gun, this tiny little necklace sends muggers and rapists running the other way, in the fear that the ‘evil devil-worshipper’ will sacrifice them. It doesn’t matter that this woman probably has never killed a person, nor sacrificed anything to any spirit or god, nor has demon minions at her beck and call—her attackers see that symbol and imagine the worst, with themselves as the potential victims. They are forced to think twice about even looking at her the wrong way.

I’ve got major respect for this woman for willing to put up with the crap she undoubtedly receives from those that vilify anything remotely ‘dark’, and using that societal fear and misrepresentation to her advantage.

 You know what? I’d take that kind of protection over proper media representation any day.

Satanism vs. Devil Worship vs. Luciferianism

After responding to a question on my last post, I realize that I’ve yet to formally make a post talking about the differences between Satanism, devil-worship, and Luciferianism. Its an issue that pops up a lot, I’m surprised it took me this long to mention it.

[Keep in mind that this is not by any means a definitive separation of the three faiths, but merely one take on the nuances between them]

The differences between those three terms (luciferianism, devil worship, and satanism) are complicated. Some will use all three synonymously, others like me do not consider them to be the same thing. Lets start with the broadest of the three–Satanism.

Satanists are mostly atheistic. They see Satan as a symbol, and their faith is heavily focused on the here and now–the materialistic, the pleasurable, the self-serving. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing–its really just self worship. Then there are the theistic Satanists who see Satan as a real being.

This is where it starts to get fuzzy. Theistic Satanists may or may not differentiate between Lucifer and Satan, but I and many Luciferians do. We see Satan as the figurehead of carnality and of the more…worldly issues, so to speak. He represents embracing what life has to offer, and living for the self. The more fervent theistic satanists may call themselves devil worshippers. Just as with any faith, there are extremists and radicals who will present their faith in a less-than-pleasant way, which has been the case for ‘devil-worshippers’. Just because the ones you hear about on the news are insane and psychopathic doesn’t mean they all are.

Luciferians can also be either theistic or atheistic. Whether we consider him a symbol or an actual god, he represents knowledge in all it’s forms. The majority of us strive for apotheosis–to become like gods, knowing good and evil. We hold ourselves accountable for our actions, and even theistic luciferians like myself rely largely on our own potential and effort. Lucifer is a guide and mentor, but ultimately my faith is what I make of it.

While I have seen a few theistic Luciferians claim to worship Lu, I myself do not use the term ‘worship’ to describe my devotion to him. Worship has connotations of submission and hierarchy and Lu has beaten it into my head enough times that we are equals in potential. There’s also the issue of blind faith in regards to worship. You have to earn praise and respect through your actions—being a god doesn’t automatically make you worthy of admiration.

While I may differentiate between all these terms, I am aware that the majority see them as interchangeable. When they speak of satan or the devil I can usually safely assume that they are also referring to Lucifer. When they refer to my practices as worship, however, I do make the effort to try to inform them on why that is not an acceptable term for my devotion.

Review of The Revelation of Lucifer the Divine

The Revelation of Lucifer the Divine…was interesting, to say the least. I can see why there’s so much talk amongst the Luciferian community regarding this book, almost equal parts good and bad.

To start off, in my opinion this was entirely fictional. Divinely influenced? Not that I can tell. The novel basically starts after man’s fall from Eden, but before Christ’s birth, and follows through until the end of Revelations. As you might imagine, Lucifer plays a key role in the storyline, but other important characters include Satan and a woman-turned-deity named Astarte.

Now, this was where I first began to doubt the book’s premise. Not only is the Satan here depicted as an Odinic figure (quite literally, too—he gave up an eye for wisdom), but, well…he is an entirely separate character unto himself. I may or may not have mentioned this before, but I firmly believe that there is no ‘Satan’—that was merely a title given to Lucifer after his fall in order to demonize him, so the appearance of his character here as the literal ruler of hell made me pause.

The random insertion of Astarte was also somewhat repellant. If the author’s intent was to portray her as the actual goddess, well…he failed miserably. Not going too much into detail here, but her role was basically the humanity and compassion to Lucifer’s icy and resolute determination. I didn’t particularly like her, just because her character was so poorly written and one-dimensional. I didn’t see the growth of character that should have been present after all of Lucifer’s teachings.

Lucifer’s characterization had me on a rollercoaster of emotions. There were instances where I found myself having to stop reading because his actions and words were so…wrong, so different and unlike the actual deity I have come to recognize. He had a martyr complex that made me cringe, a very ‘woe is me, I accept my fate but must repent’ sort of thing going on. As I have come to know him, he knows that his actions had to be done—and the very act of rebellion and subsequent ‘fall from grace’ are bound and inextricable from one another. It isn’t so much that he is regretful of his actions or feels that they were wrong, but he does regret that there was no other way to go about securing his and our freedom. It’s the difference between beating yourself up over what you think is right but others think is wrong, and being sorrowful that such actions had to be taken at all.

But on a grander scale, I suppose the holistic portrait of Lucifer was more or less accurate—he’s a fucking confusing entity. You can’t know what his thought process is, or what his purposes are; he enjoys using antithetical parables and riddles to explain things, all the while explaining everything and nothing at all.

As for the storyline itself…there was a lot of talk about fate and destiny that I didn’t necessarily agree with, and it basically read as a poorly done doomsday prophecy with all the hellfire and brimstone that goes along with it, but then again the author’s initial message reads clear: whether the novel is inspired madness, divine revelation, or false prophecy is left to the discretion of the reader.

As it stands, I still see Convivium by Andrew Maugham (which I might do a review on as well in the near future) as my top pick for an accurate representation of Lucifer. Revelation is too choppy and convoluted to make heads or tails of…which in a way, is accurate of Him as well, I suppose.

The Devil is a Useful Creature

 

Part of me wants to laugh alongside everyone else concerning this article, because I know Star Foster is referring to the devil as the personification of all things evil and not necessarily my patron, but the other part of me is rather heart-stricken. Although I am able to differentiate between the demonized caricature that some Christians have made the devil to be and who Lucifer actually is, Star is correct when she says that they treat him as the scum underneath their shoes. Although I may see the two as wholly separate beings (and the Christian ‘devil’ as the punisher of the damned and red-skinned sadist is fictional, in my opinion), many do not. Many equate Lucifer with this devil, blaming him for all their misfortunes and afflictions or accusing him of leading them astray, from all that is ‘good and true’. They call him deceiver, liar. They criticize and abhor him for tempting Eve, mistaking his gift for damnation and his intent as selfish greed.

So, some Christians do their best to condemn him as evil and vile, separating themselves from who they perceive as wicked by calling them ‘Devil-worshippers’. It becomes an ‘us’ vs. ‘them’ situation, with everyone who doesn’t belong to that same mindset as them. You don’t believe in my god? Oh, you must be a devil worshipper. You don’t agree with my beliefs? You’re in league with Satan. You worship a pagan deity? It must be Lucifer in disguise.

Unfortunately, pagans get categorized under this ‘them’ label as well. Pagans, Atheists, Sikhs, Buddhists, etc…at one point or another, they all get corralled into the ‘them’ group. This then leads to the desire to distance themselves from this unwanted label as well—the devil character has become one that no one wants to be associated with. He becomes the one enemy that everyone seems to be joined against. Therefore the devil, Satan, and Lucifer by correlation become not only the undesirables of Christianity, but of every major religion and belief system.

Through the association of Satan and the devil, Lucifer has become the untouchable of the majority of the world’s population. No one wants to be considered a ‘follower of Lucifer’, or ‘devil worshipper’ because his name has been manipulated to represent all the evils in the world, all the cruelty and hate and despair and sorrow.

All because he had an unpopular opinion and rebelled against a tyrant, bestowing knowledge upon mankind.

Now, Lucifer is thick-skinned—he doesn’t need me to defend him. But can you imagine the weight of all that bearing down on you? Knowing that millions would consider you to be the epitome of malevolence, the cause of all that is horrible in the world? Having the majority of the population blame you for…pretty much anything and everything that is considered bad?

You can imagine the amount of respect I had for my patron even before I read this article, but now, with the weight of the realization that this has caused, my respect has increased immeasurably, along with my sorrow. I always knew that his path wasn’t an easy one, but to be hated and rejected and blamed every minute of every day…

A few days ago I told my patron I wanted to help lift that burden of melancholy he carries with him. More than anything, I wanted to be a source of strength for him as he has been for me.

This has been a step towards that Work coming to fruition. As his disciple and devotee, I am part of that group to which the majority of the world directs their unjust hate and blame. I am part of the undesirables, the untouchables, of spirituality.

But I am also a representation of the fact that He is not alone. I share the burden of sorrow with him, just as I stand in solidarity with his role as Prometheus by wearing an onyx stone around my neck, similar to that chain and stone forced upon him by Zeus in remembrance of his punishment.

And I suppose, in a way, that is how I can be a source of strength to him—simply by being there, by being one of his own. I mentioned before that I’m in no way obliged to do any of this, but the fact that I do gives Lucifer hope—hope that he isn’t alone in his endeavors, or alone in his beliefs.